Contact an Ohio Asbestos Attorney about Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Lawsuits & Asbestos Exposure Settlements


Each year hundreds of Ohio men and women are diagnosed with lung cancer, pulmonary fibrosis and Mesothelioma Cancer—asbestos-related illnesses potentially due to past asbestos exposure. A diagnosis of mesothelioma and lung cancer is overwhelming news for the individual and their family.

To consider ways to assist in paying for medical expenses, you may talk to an Ohio Asbestos Attorney for information on treatment and compensation.

Joe Lyon is a Cincinnati asbestos attorney who assists those individuals and families in need of legal advice. These families are not alone. Nationwide, there are about 3,000 new diagnosis of mesothelioma a year.

Mesothelioma is a serious illness that has been linked to asbestos exposure in medical literature. It is estimated that there will be 250,000 new cases before 2020 due to the latency period of 20-50 years after being first exposed to asbestos.


Ohio Occupational Exposure


There are professions that are more associated with asbestos exposure than others, generally because of the materials used in a job or where the position was located. Occupations most likely to present an occupational exposure include:

Asbestos Exposure


Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that was first utilized in the early 1900s for its insulating abilities, fireproof properties, and versatility. It has been estimated that over 30 million tons of asbestos was used in the American economy in industrial yards, homes, schools, shipyards, and other workplaces.

The natural breakdown of asbestos products and subsequent sawing or cutting of the asbestos creates dust and fibers that are inhaled and can lead to mesothelioma and other severe forms of lung cancer.

Secondary exposure is also possible through fibers traveling on a family members clothing. Due to health concerns, all new uses of asbestos were banned in July 1989.

Joe Lyon is a highly-rated Cincinnati Catastrophic Injury lawyer and Ohio asbestos attorney with national experience in toxic mass torts.  Mr. Lyon works compassionately and directly with each of this clients providing small firm attention with large firm experience and resources. 

For a free and confidential consultation, please contact The Lyon Firm online or at 800.513.2403.


Ohio Asbestos Exposure


The vast majority of those who develop lung cancer and mesothelioma worked in an environment where asbestos was present. Workplaces may have been filled with toxic materials, and employers may have failed to warn of the serious health risks of the job. As a result, many Ohio workers have been diagnosed with the following:

Steel and Metal Workers at Risk of Exposure


According to a series of medical studies, workers in the metals and steel industry are at an increased risk for developing asbestos-related diseases. Workers that regularly inhale asbestos fibers may eventually develop severe scarring of the lungs, and fatal diseases like asbestosis or mesothelioma.

Even family members of steel factory workers are at risk of potential second-hand exposure. Asbestos fibers may be brought home on the clothes or skin of an employee.

Health issues related to asbestos exposure often develop many years after exposure, so former steel plant workers should monitor their health for signs of an asbestos-related lung disease. About 3,000 U.S. citizens will be diagnosed with mesothelioma this year.

As a result of widespread occupational exposure to toxic substances like asbestos, many former workers in Ohio are filing lawsuits to help compensate for their debilitating, and deadly illnesses.

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Ohio Auto Workers Exposure


Public health specialists say each year thousands of auto-repair workers are diagnosed with asbestos-related diseases. A warning published by the Automotive Safety Association found that approximately 1 in 10 mechanics at auto repair shops could be at risk for developing an asbestos-related cancer.

Since repair shops also are often short on air circulation, the combination enclosed work spaces and free-floating asbestos fibers makes the occupation particularly dangerous. Ohio General Motors Workers can contact The Lyon Firm, an Ohio asbestos attorney, for more information on their risk factors.

Reports from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) advise mechanics to “assume that all brakes have asbestos-type shoes.” They go on to say it is impossible to know if brake or clutch components contain asbestos by visual inspection. The danger to mechanics will continue for decades as asbestos-filled brakes on warehouse shelves continue to be installed on vehicles.


School Asbestos Exposure


The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that there are asbestos-containing materials in the majority of Ohio’s schools. Asbestos was commonly used in the materials used to construct schools in Ohio, which means children may be exposed anywhere on the premises, included in classrooms, cafeterias, hallways and gymnasiums.

In 2013, inspectors found damaged asbestos that needed repair or removal in more than 600 locations at more than 180 schools in Chicago. In 2014, families and teaching staff at several California school districts were seriously concerned when contractors removed asbestos materials unsafely earlier that year.

The school districts reportedly failed to warn parents and teachers about the project, and also failed to use proper preventative measures to prevent exposure. The schools and its contractors violated EPA regulations and put teachers and students at risk.


Ohio Power Plant Asbestos


Due to the extreme heat and fire hazards at Ohio power plants, asbestos insulation was regularly installed throughout buildings in the walls, pipes, boilers, electric and most machinery before the 1980s. As a result, many plants workers were exposed to asbestos, possibly inhaling loose fibers into their lungs, potentially causing serious diseases and cancers like mesothelioma.

Aside from the buildings being filled with asbestos, Ohio workers in some capacities often raised their risk of exposure by wearing asbestos-containing protective clothing, including coats, aprons, mitts and masks.

Over time, asbestos insulation and products break down and release toxic fibers into the air, endangering thousands of workers in power plants such as welders, electricians, pipefitters and maintenance workers in contact with insulated areas.

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Ohio Shipyard Workers Cancer


For the last 75 years, shipyard workers have been among those in the U.S. workforce with an elevated risk of asbestos exposure. Particularly before 1980, it is likely that workers in the ship building industry were in contact with dangerous levels of asbestos, increasing their chances of developing diseases like lung cancer and mesothelioma.

A 2008 study, published by the Ulster Medical Society, indicated shipyard workers have an asbestosis mortality rate 16-times greater than other studied occupations. Authorities have estimated that thousands of shipyard workers—many in Ohio—have died as a result of excess asbestos exposure.


Construction Asbestos Lawsuits


Nearly any construction, renovation or demolition site in Ohio could have the potential to expose workers to harmful asbestos fibers. Asbestos has numerous applications in the construction industry, and many were used as common practice up until the 1980s in the construction of homes, schools and commercial buildings. Some of the most commonly used materials include the following:

  • Adhesives (asphaltic cutback adhesive, emulsion adhesive, fibrous adhesive, lagging adhesive)
  • Construction Mastics
  • Gold Bond Adhesives
  • Gunning Mix
  • Ductwork Connectors and duct adhesive
  • Floor Backing
  • Drywall taping compounds
  • Insulation
  • Flooring tiles
  • Roofing tiles and seals
  • Cement and Cement adhesive
  • Wallpaper
  • Vinyl flooring
  • Spray-on acoustic insulation
  • Duct tape
  • Joint packing
  • Construction felts
  • Siding panels
  • Textured paints
  • Loose-fill attic insulation

Asbestos exposure and its deadly consequences are an ongoing issue throughout the country. Medical studies estimate that the cumulative total number of asbestos associated deaths in the United States may exceed 200,000 by the year 2030.

Construction companies and manufacturers of building materials have a responsibility to provide America’s employees with safe working environments.


In 2010, a painter in Texas who developed mesothelioma after spending much of his life working with texturized top coats and fillers sued a number of asbestos product manufacturers. A jury awarded him an $11 million verdict.
•    In 2005, a San Francisco jury awarded a sheet metal worker nearly $2 million dollars after he developed mesothelioma from working with duct connectors and duct sealers, which contained asbestos.
•    Owens Corning Fiberglass Corporation was found negligent and a jury awarded one victim of mesothelioma a verdict of nearly $3.5 million. His attorney said the man worked for Owens Corning  in the 1960s and was exposed to their toxic insulation product.
•    In the 1990s, two engineers filed lawsuits against North American Refractory Company (NARCO). According to their lawyers, the victims, who suffered from related lung diseases, were exposed to high levels of asbestos dust from a gunning mix. The jury found North American Refractory Company liable and awarded the men $7 million.


Ohio Asbestos Exposure Sites 


Most deaths from malignant mesothelioma in the United States are the result of exposures to asbestos decades prior. However, the continuing occurrence of mesothelioma deaths among persons under the age of 55 suggests ongoing occupational and environmental exposures to asbestos fibers, despite years of action by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) aimed at limiting asbestos exposure for much of the last 40 years.

Although inspection data for the last 30 years indicated a general decline in occupational exposure, 20 percent of air samples collected in the construction industry in 2003 exceeded the OSHA permissible exposure limit.

Asbestos can be found in homes built before 1980, construction sites, and in many military circumstances. According to the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety (NIOHS), there are 75 different jobs that can expose workers to asbestos, with those jobs primarily involving construction and manufacturing. Approximately 107,000 workers are affected by asbestos each year.

Contact an Ohio asbestos attorney if you have been affected. Here in Cincinnati, the local economy included plants and facilities that manufactured, processed and used asbestos and asbestos products. The following are the most common Cincinnati and Ohio asbestos exposure sites:

Settlements are likely for those suffering from workplace exposure in the past. Many companies who manufactured or used asbestos materials in their facilities have set up mesothelioma trust funds for victims. Do not hesitate to use these resources, because they rightly belong to victims of toxic exposure.

If you wish to discuss your case with an Ohio asbestos attorney, you will meet directly with Joe Lyon to discuss all aspects of your case.  While no amount of compensation can buy our health, a mesothelioma lawsuit settlement can assist in providing better medical care and paying the bills so you can focus on your health, recovery, and spending quality time with your family.


Ohio Mesothelioma Lawsuits


Ohio has strict rules on the time frame involved in filing a lawsuit with an Ohio asbestos attorney. You should call a lawyer to discuss this matter.  The statute of limitations depends on a variety of factors, and a failure to file within a specific time period may result in a dismissal of your claim.

The success rates of settlements regarding asbestos exposure injury are quite high. It may be necessary to prove that occupational exposure is the primary cause of lung cancer or mesothelioma, though this is the job of The Lyon Firm, and we have experience in reaching large mesothelioma settlements.


EPA Asbestos Approval


The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will no longer evaluate asbestos in homes and businesses as a serious danger or health risk, as the EPA announced in recent reports. The EPA asbestos decisions, under Scott Pruitt, decided it is unnecessary to evaluate the health risks of the toxic substance despite the continuing workplace and home hazards that still lead to mesothelioma deaths for up to 3,000 Americans each year.

The agency will still evaluate and require approval for any new use of asbestos, but let the already-present toxin remains in many public building, businesses, schools, houses and hospitals. Fifty-five countries have a total ban on the use of asbestos, including nations like the United Kingdom, South Africa, and Japan.

The new EPA asbestos stance has gone mostly undeterred because the current administration sees eye-to-eye on safety deregulation and pro-corporate interests. The health and safety of American workers and consumers, however, already in danger, could lose its footing as the EPA drifts toward toxic tolerance.

Joe Lyon is an Ohio asbestos attorney representing plaintiffs in Ohio asbestos exposure cancer lawsuits related to workplace toxic tort and consumer asbestos injury claims.


EPA Asbestos Standards


According to the EPA Website, exposure to asbestos increases the risk of developing lung diseases like mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis. That risk is made worse by certain factors, such as smoking and long-term exposure in workplaces known to be laden with the toxin.

There is no safe amount of asbestos exposure, and the greater the exposure to asbestos, the greater the chance of developing severe health problems. Lung disease symptoms may lay dormant after exposure, and can take years to develop.

Asbestos-related health conditions can be difficult to identify and confused with other respiratory health issues. Healthcare professionals help identify the possibility of asbestos exposure by looking at the person’s medical, work, and environmental history. Known major health effects have been linked to asbestos exposure including lung cancer, pulmonary fibrosis, adenocarcinoma and mesothelioma.


On one hand the EPA regards asbestos as a cancer-causing agent, which fills older buildings and presents health hazards to various Ohio workers and consumers, and yet the agency has not taken measures to eradicate the toxin as safety advocates say they could.

The EPA has not properly evaluated the dangerous legacy of existing and so levels of contamination are unknown in Ohio. We do know asbestos exists in many areas in homes, schools, hospitals, factories, auto products, and workplaces but there is little help in evaluating an individual’s Ohio asbestos exposure risks.

A recent report released by a Massachusetts revealed that the government doesn’t even have a record of how many schools in the country contain asbestos. Ohio Asbestos Attorneys and members of congress cannot rely simply on addressing longstanding safety concerns, and have decided legal action is often the only way to create a safer home and work environment.

Despite a significant reduction in the use of asbestos in past decades, annual deaths continue because asbestos-related diseases lay dormant.


Asbestos Exposure FAQ


Why is Asbestos Toxic?

When asbestos breaks down over time or with use, the fibers of the material can become airborne, presenting a risk of inhaling or ingesting the toxin. Asbestos is a cancer-causing agent, and those heavily exposed can develop scarring in the lungs and later develop lug cancer and mesothelioma.

Why Did Companies Use Asbestos?

Asbestos was cheap, durable, fire-resistant and light, and was though to be the perfect insulating material before research showed it was extremely hazardous tot he health.

What Materials Contain Asbestos?

Asbestos was widely used in piping, insulation, electrical components, machine parts, packaging, flooring, ceiling tiles, roofing, and in many building materials.

Can I File a Mesothelioma Lawsuit?

If you were exposed to asbestos at your workplace, and have developed cancer or a related illness, you are likely to qualify for compensation.


If you or a loved one has suffered an injury due to Asbestos Exposure and have questions about the root cause and the legal remedies available to improve quality of life and medical care in Ohio, contact The Lyon Firm at (800) 513-2403. You will speak directly with Mr. Lyon, an Ohio asbestos attorney, and he will help you answer these critical questions.