Dog Bite Injuries Underreported in Ohio & Nationwide - The Lyon Firm
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Dog Bite Injuries Underreported in Ohio & Nationwide

Permanent injuries & complications resulting from Ohio Dog Bite Injuries


Dogs account for more than 4.5 million bite injuries every year in the United States. In the majority of dog bite injuries, the situations involve attacks on children, which can lead to serious infection, permanent physical and emotional scarring, as well as death.

Ohio dog owners have a responsibility to control all pets, including dogs. If a dog should attack and cause injury to a child or adult in a public space, the owner may be liable for any injuries suffered by dog bite victims. In fact, the owner may be held accountable for dog bite injuries even if the dog has not exhibited dangerous behavior in the past.

Dog bites account for about one percent of U.S. emergency department visits. Because there is a high risk of infection with dog bite injuries including tooth puncture wounds, antibiotics are regularly administered. Rabies prophylaxis may be addressed of the animal in question may be unvaccinated. In most states like Ohio, physicians are required by law to report animal bites. But with that said, many dog bite victims do not report attacks because an injury may be minor, and a dangerous dog may have another chance to cause injury in the future.

In the United States, over 35 percent of households own at least one dog. In most cases, a dog present little danger, though people forget their dog has animal instincts that are not always understood. If threatened or irritated by an owner or stranger, a dog will bite, causing dog bite injuries that may include infection, nerve damage, tissue damage and scarring. Dogs that bite the most may include:

  • Chihuahua
  • Bulldog
  • Pit Bull
  • German Shepherd
  • Australian Shepherd
  • Lhasa Apso
  • Jack Russell Terrier
  • Cocker Spaniel
  • Bull Terrier
  • Pekingese
  • Papillion

Children at Highest Risk of Dog Bite Injuries

Children are at highest risk for dog bites, and should not be allowed to play with unknown dogs unsupervised. Children should take the following precautions with dogs:

  • Ask if it is okay to pet someone else’s dog before reaching out
  • When approached by an unknown dog, remain motionless
  • If a dog attacks and knocks you over, curl into a ball with head tucked and your hands over your ears and neck.
  • Tell adults about stray dogs or aggressive dogs
  • Don’t run from a dog
  • Don’t disturb a dog that is sleeping, eating, or caring for puppies
  • Avoid direct eye contact with a strange dog

Dogs Carry Diseases: Present Infection Risks

Dog bite injuries in Ohio are likely to spread germs and dangerous bacteria. Up to 18 percent of dog bites become infected with at least one of over 60 kinds of bacteria found in dog mouths. Dog bite injuries can cause the following diseases:

  • Rabies—Rabies is a virus that affects the brain and can be fatal once symptoms appear. Rabies virus is most commonly spread through the bite and saliva of an infected dog. Victims bitten by a dog should speak with a medical professional to see if rabies vaccination is necessary.
  • Capnocytophaga—Capnocytophaga can spread to people through dog bites or scratches.
  • Pasteurella—this bacteria seen in over half of infected dog bite wounds, and causes a painful, red infection at the bite site of the bite. May lead to swollen glands, swelling in the joints, and difficulty moving.
  • MRSA—a staph infection resistant to a certain group of antibiotics. Dogs and other animals can carry MRSA, and can cause skin, lung, and urinary tract infections in people.
  • Tetanus—a toxin produced by Clostridium tetani, and may cause paralysis in people with deep bite wounds.

Joe Lyon is a highly-rated Cincinnati Catastrophic injury lawyer and Ohio premises liability lawyer. Following dog bite injuries, contact Mr. Lyon at 800.513.2403 for a free consultation. 

Contact us today.